Social Security Prefers Disability Claimants Be In Treatment

by Editorial Board on August 17, 2010 · 0 comments

in Winning Disability Benefits,Basics of SSD,Treatment & Compliance,Medical Evidence

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The fact that claimants should be in treatment, and be compliant with that treatment, is a critically important rule of the Social Security Administration.  This rule is based around the idea that the person filing for disability benefits appears most reasonable if they are doing everything they can do to get better, and even treatment they are not well enough to work.  Contrast that with someone who is not doing anything to get better, or even worse, someone who is non-compliant with their doctor’s orders or is using drugs and alcohol in a way that makes their condition worse.

People who file for Social Security Disability benefits are called claimants.  Social Security requires claimants to have medical evidence to prove their case.  The best evidence you can have is from your own doctor (“treating physician”.)

What does this mean for you?  You need to be regularly seeing your doctors for all of your disabling conditions.  For each condition, you need to be compliant with your treatment plan as well.  That means you should be taking medications and following your doctor’s orders.

If you can show that you are doing everything you can to make yourself well, and you still cannot work or keep a full time job, you will be able to prove that you are disabled under Social Security’s rules.

If you are not currently in treatment, call and make appointments with your doctors.  If you need help getting into treatment, or getting an indigent health insurance plan, research it online or check with your local county health office and ask for referrals to clinics that can help you.  If you are represented by a lawyer, ask your lawyer for advice regarding medical care in your area.

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